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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the international monetary fund, annie lowry an economic policy reporter for "the new york times." steven moore, editorial writer for "the wall street journal." ken, you tear financial crisis guru here. forget the politics. just give us the math. if washington fails to avert the cliff, the worst-case scenario will be the combination of tax hikes and spending cuts. what does that do to our economy? >> well, if they don't come to a deal and then sit there all next year and don't come to a deal, we will go back into recession. it will be very, very ugly. and the united states is one of the few bright spots in the world and it will be ugly to have the whole world go into recession. but i don't think that's likely. i think if we pass for a month then they'll eventually pass something. but it shows the dysfunction in washington of not being able to pass anything. by the way, ali, the debt ceiling's coming up. they're not agreeing on that. so even if they agree on this, then in a month or two they're going to be in the same position on the debt ceiling. >> and our debt ceiling actually comes to a head
. paul krugerman has said liberal firebrand in the "new york times" said it's a horrible idea. terrible, stupid idea and this is not something that the white house should consider at all. >> let's bring back the rest of the panel. ceo of pimco, and mark zandy a is a chief economist with moody's analytics. mark, when you say we're the cleanest dirty shirts, i wonder when it comes to negotiations we are there are republicans who will not accept taxing the marginal income. the income above $1 million and increasing that tax on the rich and you've got some democrats who won't agree to this idea of a chained cpi. bottom line mohammed, there are going to have to be tough decisions, you cannot win budget concessions without tough decisions. when you guys are looking at how the united states solves its problems, what are the obvious ways? >> the obvious way is to get together and recognize that you can only solve a long-term debt issues in the context of high growth. you approach the fiscal problem in a way that makes sure that you also promote economic growth. so that has two implications. one
like new york, like london has, have congestion pricing so it's not a free good. make people who use the car pay for it and tilt the balance of our infrastructure funding using some of those funds to rebuild our public transit infrastructure. as you know, i've traveled into new york all the time and travel into canada all the time. my wife always reminds me to difference of traveling into pearson airport versus the new york, our greatest city in the world, airports. we've got to put a little more money. we know airplanes according to a whole range of recent studies are big economic generators. act on the same plane as our high-tech industry clusters. we need to rebuild our airports, invest in our public transit as well as keeping our roads going. but let's pay for the roads. >> ken, i see you nodding. do you think there are some things that rank higher than other things or should this be done as a portfolio, that there are a lot of things that need to be fixed? richard made a reference to the $2 trillion number to get our infrastructure on a national level up to a reliable point. >>
. >> the idea that some places like new york city have all their power wires under ground, other places are susceptible to trees and things falling. former new york governor george pataki wrote that in the wake of sandy, more lerelectrical wires need to be located under ground. it sounds entirely reasonable and sensible and you say that's crazy. >> well, i mean i think it is reasonable in some areas and when a line goes down, it sometimes make sense to bury it. we have a lot of electricity lines in this country and putting them under ground, we're no longer looking at illions with a b in front of it, we're start torg look at trillions. these are investments that utilities need to make and are paid for by rate payers. utilities are starting to build a lot more transmission on their own and, you know, they are trying to harden their systems, but again, by smartens up, by making it so that when the wind knocks a line down, it isn't such a catastrophe, that's a lot cheapernd smarter way to start fixing our system than to try to put this entire above ground network that we have, todown, star
are pressing for specific proposals. new york mayor, michael bloomberg said calling for meaningful action is not enough. we need immediate action. we have heard all the rhetoric before. what we have not seen is leadership. not from the white house, and not from congress. gun violence has not been a priority for the obama administration as he ran for president in 2008, obama supported reinstating a ban on assault weapons. >> don't tell me we can't uphold the second amendment while keeping ak-47s out of the hands of criminals. >> reporter: once again being he did not make good on his campaign pledge. the brady committee to end gun violence gave the president f's across the board on the report card. congress, even in the democratic-controlled senate, there's been little appetite to touch the controversial issue. multiple gun control bills have been introduced. not a single one has made it to the floor for a vote. those involved in the debate over guns say the president has a number of options. reinstating some form of the assault weapons ban that expired in 1994. banning high-count magazines
's not causal. >> it is, absolutely. >> that's not really. >> you live in new york i live in d.c., washington, this is all causal. the reason he's talking about tax increases is to avoid the conversation and dealing with spending restraints. that's why obama does what he does. >> the reason i doubt that, grover, is because we've all done the math and we all absolutely agree on the math that you can't get out of the deficit hole we're in by taxing rich people even if you tax them at 100%. everybody know knows that. so when republicans say we don't have a tax problem, we have a spending problem, the fact is we've got both and we can deal with that. you gave your blessing to the proposal that john boehner put together and so many congressional republicans are scared for voting for something that feels like looks like, a tax increase because they're worried that your organization will come back to haunt them. they signed a pledge, you gave your blessing and they still couldn't get the votes on the floor. what's up with that? why did that not happen? a week ago i was hopeful we might have a deal.
about a school shooting. joining me now is an author from new york. dave, you wrote about the tragedy. does yesterday's killing bear a resemblance to that or virginia tech or any of the other shootings? >> well, yes it does in a whole lot of ways. especially emotionally i think for all of us. i talked to quite a few of the columbine survivors yesterday who were having really, really rough days in different ways. it pulls that together and then of course the same questions that we're asking with everyone wanting to know he why and we made a lot of mistakes in that case of jumping too quickly to why. i think the press is much better now at understanding to be more cautious about these things but still a desire to understand why this happened and how it fits into this wider picture of why all of these shootings. >> is there anything that -- with between all of the shootings, the suspects, is there anything that resonates with you about detecting signs that a person is about to commit such a horrific crime or do these people sometimes just snap? >> yeah, that's a great question. they defi
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)